INFLUENCE OF THE FULL AND NEW MOON ON ONSET OF LABOR AND SPONTANEOUS RUPTURE OF MEMBRANES

Authors

  • Ellen W. Stern MSN, CNM,

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    • Ellen W. Stem received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Ohio State University in 1969, and a Master of Science in Nursing with a certificate in Midwifery from Case Western Reserve University in 1986. Ms. Stem is on the clinical faculty of the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Department of Midwifery, and maintains a private midwifery practice, Woman's Health Care Center, Inc., Garfield Heights, Ohio

  • Greer L. Glazer PhD, RN,

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    • Greer Glazer received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Michigan in 1976, and a Master of Science in Maternity/Gynecologic Nursing from Case Western Reserve University in 1979. Dr. Glazer received a Ph.D. in Nursing from Case Western Reserve University in 1984, and is currently an Associate Professor of Parent/Child Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

  • Nick Sanduleak PhD

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    • Nick Sanduleak is a Senior Research Associate in the Astronomy Department at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio


Kent State University, School of Nursing, Kent, OH 44242.

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the influence of the new and full moon on onset of labor and spontaneous rupture of membranes. Admissions during the year 1984 to the labor and delivery unit of a large urban hospital in Cleveland, Ohio, in spontaneous labor or with rupture of the membranes, comprised the sample population (N = 1999). Barometric pressure for each day of 1984 and the days of the full and new moon were also recorded. Frequencies for onset of labor and spontaneous rupture of membranes at the full and new moon were compared with days controlled for barometric pressure. Contingency analysis by chi-square was used. Results show a positive significant correlation of the onset of labor to the full moon when barometric pressure is not controlled. Frequencies of onset of labor and spontaneous rupture of membranes show positive nonsignificant correlation when barometric pressure is controlled. Results indicate a compounding, if not primary, influence by barometric pressure to that of the full and/or new moon.

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