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EFFECTIVENESS OF PRENATAL CARE AND EDUCATION FOR PREGNANT ADOLESCENTS: Nurse-Midwifery Intervention and Team Approach

Authors

  • Janina Smoke cnm, msn,

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    • Janina Smoke was Coordinator of the Adolescent Obstetrical Services, University of Cincinnati Hospital. She received her M.S.N. from Ohio State University. Her nurse-midwifery education was at State University of New York, Downstate.

  • Mary C. Grace med, ms

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    • Mary C. Grace is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. She received her M. Ed. from Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio, and an M.S. in Research Design and Statistics from the University of Cincinnati.


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ABSTRACT

The two-fold purpose of this controlled study is to evaluate the change in pregnancy-related knowledge by pre- and post education testing and to compare the pregnancy outcomes in two adolescent groups. The control group received routine obstetrical care at city health department clinics. The experimental group received care from an adolescent obstetrical service based in a university hospital. The adolescent service team was coordinated by a nurse-midwife and included a registered nurse, nutritionist, and social worker. A prenatal educational program of nine classes was developed for the special needs of the adolescents. The improvement in knowledge was significant for the experimental group (p < .05). The experimental group experienced significantly fewer low hematocrits (p < .05 and p < .001), less medication while in labor (p < .05), fewer maternal and fetal complications (both p < .01), fewer blood transfusions (p < .05), and fewer extra infant hospital days (p < .05).

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