KNOWLEDGE AND PERCEPTIONS OF HIV INFECTION AMONG HOMELESS PREGNANT WOMEN

Authors

  • Ann Christiano CNM, MPH,

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    • Ann Christiano is an Assistant Clinical Professor at the State University of New York Nurse-Midwifery program. She earned her BS in nursing from Boston University School Of Nursing in 1977, her Certificate in Nurse-Midwifery in 1984 from The State University of New York, and her MPH from Hunter College in 1987. Prior to her faculty appointment, Ms. Christiano was a staff midwife at North Central Bronx Hospital in New York City. She is a member of the American College of Nurse-Midwives Ad Hoc Committee on AIDS.

  • Ida Susser PHD

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    • Ann Christiano is an Assistant Clinical Professor at the State University of New York Nurse-Midwifery program. She earned her BS in nursing from Boston University School Of Nursing in 1977, her Certificate in Nurse-Midwifery in 1984 from The State University of New York, and her MPH from Hunter College in 1987. Prior to her faculty appointment, Ms. Christiano was a staff midwife at North Central Bronx Hospital in New York City. She is a member of the American College of Nurse-Midwives Ad Hoc Committee on AIDS.


  • Ida Susser is an Associate Professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center in the Community Health Education Department. She has earned her BA in anthropology from Barnard College in 1970, her MA in anthropology from the University of Chicago in 1974, and her PhD from Columbia University in anthropology in 1980. She has taught community health and medical anthropology for 10 years. She authored Norman Street in 1982 and has written other articles on women, politics, and health.

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ABSTRACT

This research examines the knowledge and perceptions of HIV infection among pregnant women in a hotel for the homeless in New York City in the Spring of 1987. The primary method of research was participatory observation. Issues examined include knowledge of the modes of transmission, use of preventive strategies, and familiarity with persons who have AIDS.

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