A DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS OF HOME BIRTHS ATTENDED BY CNMs IN TWO NURSE-MIDWIFERY SERVICES

Authors

  • Rondi Anderson CNM, MS,

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    • Rondi Anderson, CNM, MS, is a nurse-midwife in a private home birth service in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. She received her master's degree and nurse-midwifery education at the University of Utah, graduating in 1989, and a B.S.N. from Michigan State University in 1985. Prior to her nursing education, she practiced midwifery for 10 years in a home birth practice.

  • Deborah Greener CNM, PhD

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    • Deborah Greener, CNM, PhD, received her master's degree in nurse-midwifery, and her Ph.D. in educational evaluation and measurement from the University of Utah. Active in nurse-midwifery clinical practice, education, and research, she was Chair of the Clinical Research Committee of the ACNM Division of Research during the development and validation of the NMCDS. She is presently in private practice at the Baltimore Birth Center and provides consultation for midwifery education and evaluation research.


CNM, 241 East Orange Street, Lancaster, PA 17602

ABSTRACT

This study examined outcome data from two nurse-midwifery operated home birth services in Texas. All clients who planned a home birth within the two services during 1987 comprised the population. Analyses revealed that women choosing home birth with these nurse-midwives were more frequently married, usually white, and more educated when compared with the overall U.S. childbearing population. Analgesia, episiotomy, and cesarean delivery were all found at lower rates than is reported when birth occurs in a hospital setting; complications occurred less frequently or at similar rates to those reported in the home birth literature and national statistics. Research, educational, and clinical implications of the study are discussed.

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