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ASSESSMENT OF THE PROCESS AND OUTCOMES OF THE FIRST 1,000 BIRTHS OF A NURSE-MIDWIFERY SERVICE

Authors

  • Carmela M. Cavero CNM, MS,

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    • Carmela M. Cavero, CNM, MS is the former clinical director of the Nurse-Midwifery Group of Fresno and assistant clinical professor, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Services, University of California, San Francisco.

  • Judith T. Fullerton PhD, CNM,

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    • Judith T. Fullerton, PhD, CNM, is an associate professor of Clinical Family Medicine, Department of Community and Family Medicine, University of California, San Diego, and University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing Assistant Dean for Joint Programs at UCSD, where she directs a graduate program of nurse-practitioner and nurse-midwifery studies.

  • Jeffrey A. Bartlòme MS

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    • Jeffrey A, Bartlòme, MS, formerly a research associate in the Department of Community and Family Medicine, UCSD, is currently completing doctoral studies in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Administrative Sciences and serving as director of the Institute of Rural Health Studies at the Idaho State University.


Department of Community and Family Medicine, 0809, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093

ABSTRACT

This article is a retrospective descriptive analysis of the first 1,000 births conducted by the Nurse-Midwifery Group of Fresno County, California, over the period from 1980 to 1985. The multiethnic patient population was of mixed obstetric risk. Nurse-midwifery care was offered within the context of a comprehensive maternity care program in close collaboration with a perinatal health care team Patient care outcomes were quite favorable when compared with county and state statistics. A perinatal mortality rate of 7.0/1,000 was observed. The incidence of low birth weight infants (5.7%) and the cesarean section rate (7.7%) were also lower than county and state statistics. These data add to the growing body of literature that suggests that nurse-midwifery care, within the structure of collaborative practice, can be effective and advantageous. The nurse-midwifery service made a contribution to access to perinatal care for the residents of this community.

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