PRIMARY CARE AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF THE NEWBORN

General Considerations for the CNM

Authors

  • Martha K. Swartz MS, RNC, PNP

    Associate Professor, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Martha K. Swartz, MS, RNC, PNP, is a graduate of Oberlin College, Case Western Reserve University, and the University of Michigan. She is currently Associate Professor at Yale University School of Nursing, where she has taught and practiced as a pediatric nurse practitioner for the past 10 years. Her area of clinical expertise is in primary care of the newborn and young children at risk.


Child Health Division, Yale University School of Nursing, P.O. Box 9740, 25 Park Street, New Haven, CT 06536-0740.

ABSTRACT

A primary responsibility of a practitioner caring for a newborn is to make early, frequent assessments of the infant during the immediate stabilization period. In this paper, potentially pathologic findings of this period are reviewed and guidelines for routine follow-up care of the newborn are presented. Finally, common concerns of the newborn period (inconsolable crying, apnea, respiratory irregularities, jaundice, risk of infection, gastrointestinal problems, and acute eye disorders) are discussed in conjunction with aspects of the differential diagnosis and indications for referral.

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