THE ROLE OF NURSE MIDWIVES IN PROVIDING NEWBORN AND CHILD CARE

Authors

  • Lynette Russell CNM, MS,

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    • Lynette Russell, CNM, MS, received her master's degree from Columbia University in 1972. She is currently practicing with the midwivery service at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center In Hanover, New Hampshire, and is a clinical assistant professor at Dartmouth Medical School.

  • Charlotte “Pixie” Elsberry CNM, MSN,

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    • Charlotte “Pixie” Elsberry, CNM, MSN, received her master's degree from Yale University in 1965. She is currently the director of the midwifery service at the North Central Bronx Hospital Montefiore Medical Center Affiliation in Bronx, New York.

  • Karen Hubbard CNM, MS,

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    • Karen Hubbard, CNM, MS, received her master's degree from the University of Utah in 1978. In 1981, she founded the Milwaukie Birth Center in Milwaukie, Oregon. She is presently the director of the birth center.

  • Kate MacNeil CNM, CFNP, BSN,

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    • Kate MacNeil, CNM, CFNP, BSN, is a nurse-midwife and family nurse practitioner. She graduated from the Frontier Nursing Service in 1990. She is currently a staff nurse-midwife at Su Clinica Familiar Birth Center in Harlingen, Texas.

  • Rita Rhoads-Martinez CNM, CFNP, BSN

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    • Rita Rhoads-Martinez, CNM, CFNP, BSN, is a nurse-midwife and family nurse practitioner. She is a graduate of Frontier Nursing Service. In 1978, she founded the Rhoads Martinez Family Health Services, which includes a birth center in Quarryville, Pennsylvania. She is currently the director of this service.


5 Woodhaven, A, White River Junction, VT 05001.

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this exchange is to share the experiences and practices of four nurse-midwifery services that are involved in aspects of newborn and child care. Some examples of historical developments that have influenced the divergent trends in newborn child care in midwifery today are given. The contributors describe special procedures, as well as extended care of newborns as they become infants, children, and young adults. The type and extent of care provided is responsive to the needs and expectations of the families served and to the community in which the service is located. It also reflects the philosophy of the midwifery practice.

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