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ARE WE LOSING THE ART OF MIDWIFERY?

Authors

  • Carol Wood CNM, EdD,

  • Anne Katz Jacobson CNM, MS

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Anne Katz Jacobson (the former Anne Stein), CNM. MS. is currently a staff nurse-midwife at North Central Bronx Hospital, Bronx, NY. In addition, she is an adjunct clinical preceptor for nurse-midwifery integration students from Yale University and UMDNJ Nurse-Midwifery Educational Programs and for precertification students from Frontier Service Educational Program. A 1972 graduate of King's County–Downstate University Nurse-Midwifery Program, she received her M.S. degree from Columbia University in 1977


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ABSTRACT

There has been an increasing emphasis on the use of technology for the assessment and evaluation of women during the antepartum and intrapartum periods. As a result, “hands-on” skills, such as abdominal palpation and clinical pelvimetry, receive less emphasis in educational programs and practice. Are nurse-midwifery educational programs turning the focus of their curriculum too frequently toward high-risk pregnancy and away from the normal pregnancy? There is a need to balance nurse-midwifery education, to consider the needs of all pregnant women while incorporating advances in technology appropriately. Some recent graduates are not adequately trained in the use of assessment skills that are not dependent upon technology; thus, their capability as practitioners is compromised. Integration of new content into nurse-midwifery curricula should always reflect the philosophy of each program. Renewed attention to teaching, using, and assessing these skills should be encouraged.

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