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EXTERNAL CEPHALIC VERSION

Authors

  • Lee S. Clay CNM, MS,

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      Lee S. Clay, CNM, 34 Hunt Drive, Piscataway, NJ 08854-6269.
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    • Lee S. Clay, CNM, MS, is an associate editor for the Journal of Nurse-Midwifery. She received a B.S.N. degree from Duke University and an M.S. degree from Columbia University. She is a clinical assistant professor at the Nurse Midwifery Program at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

  • Karen Criss CNM, MS,

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    • Karen Criss, CNM, MS, is a graduate of Fairleigh Dickinson University and the Nurse Midwifery Program at Columbia University. She is the director of the Nurse Midwifery Service at Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey. Karen is also a clinical instructor for the Nurse Midwifery Program at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She is currently president of the New Jersey Chapter of the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  • Unjeria C. Jackson MD

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    • Unjeria C. Jackson, MD, received her undergraduate degree from Yale University and her medical degree from Boston University School of Medicine. She completed her OB/GYN residency at Harlem Hospital in New York City and her fellowship in maternai-fetal medicine at Columbia University. She is the director of the Division of Perinatology at Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey and is board certified in OB/GYN and maternal-fetal medicine.


Lee S. Clay, CNM, 34 Hunt Drive, Piscataway, NJ 08854-6269.

ABSTRACT

External cephalic version has been used periodically for centuries to manage breech presentations. As cesarean section rates have escalated in the last two decades, ways to curb this rise have been evaluated. By reducing the number of infants that arrive in labor in a representation, it is possible to impact the overall cesarean section rate. External cephalic version is a safe, effective method when used in appropriate cases of breech presentation. A forward or backward roll can be accomplished in women at term with singleton gestations, adequate amniotic fluid, and reactive nonstress tests. Parity, fetal and placental position, and descent of the presenting part may all influence the success rate of the version.

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