Get access

DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSLATION OF AN ENGLISH-SPANISH DUAL-LANGUAGE INSTRUMENT ADDRESSING ACCESS TO PRENATAL CARE FOR THE BORDER-DWELLING HISPANIC WOMEN OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY

Authors

  • Judith T. Fullerton PhD, CNM,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Judith T. Fullerton, PhD, CNM, is currently Associate Professor of Clinical Family Medicine, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, and Assistant Dean for Joint Programs, University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing, where she directs a program of family nurse-practitioner and nurse-midwifery studies. She received her baccalaureate in nursing from Wayne State University, a master of science and certificate in nurse-midwifery from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in health education from Temple University.

  • Helen M. Wallace MD, MPH,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Helen M. Wallace, MD, MPH, is Professor of Maternal and Child Health, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, and formerly Professor and Chair, Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of California, Berkeley, Graduate School of Public Health. She received her B.A. degree from Wellesley College, the M.D. degree from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the M.P.H. degree from Harvard University School of Public Health.

  • Susanna Concha-Garcia BA

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Susanna Concha-Garcia, BA, is Research Associate, Department of Community and Family Medicine, University of California, San Diego. She received her baccalaureate of arts in urban studies and planning from the University of California, San Diego. She has a private practice in childbirth education serving the Hispanic population of San Diego County.


Department of Community and Family Medicine, 0809, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093–0809.

ABSTRACT

The health of populations residing on either side of the United States–Mexican border has public policy implications for both border communities. A study of barriers to prenatal care for residents of the San Diego, California–Tijuana. Mexico region was conducted. The study was designed specifically to address the availability of health services for women who crossed the border in either direction. This article reports the methodology used in the construction and validation of a dual-language (as opposed to a Spanish language form) survey instrument that was developed for the study. Particular attention is given to the methodology used for language translation to ensure that it would reflect the idiomatic diversity of the multicultural population.

Ancillary