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FETAL SEX PREFERENCE OF SECOND-TRIMESTER GRAVIDAS

Authors

  • Molly Kay Walker RNC, CNM, DSN,

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    • Molly Kay Walker, RNC, CNM, DSN, received her baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral degrees from the University of Alabama School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she was an assistant professor in the School of Nursing Graduate Programs at the time of the study completion. She is a certified nurse-midwife, NCC-certified OB/GYN nurse-practitioner, and has practiced as a reproductive ultrasound technician in prenatal diagnosis clinics. She is a member of ACNM, NAACOG, ANA, and Sigma Theta Tau and is currently practicing with the Division of Maternal—Fetal Medicine at UAB. Her research agenda will continue to focus on sex preference phenomena.

  • Garris Keels Conner RN, DSN

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    • Garris Keels Conner, RN, DSN, is currently an associate professor of maternal—child nursing in the graduate programs at the University of Alabama School of Nursing. She received her baccalaureate degree from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Charleston, South Carolina, and her master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Alabama School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is a member of ANA, NLN, NAACOG, NANN, and Sigma Theta Tau. Her recent research explores endotracheal suctioning in premature infants.


3Maternal & Fetal Medicine, OHB, Room 457, University of Alabama at Birmingham, UAB Station, Birmingham, AL 35294-7333.

ABSTRACT

Fetal sex preferences of pregnant women are based on psychological, physiologic, economic, and sociologic factors. Parental responses to the knowledge of fetal/infant sex range from feticide to preferential treatment of the preferred-sexed child. This study describes the sex preferences, sex beliefs, attempted sex preselection techniques, and desire to know the fetal sex of 243 second-trimester gravidas. Data demonstrated a willingness to disclose sex preferences, with 81% declaring a preference. The majority of women (81%) also wished to know the sex of their child prior to delivery regardless of their acknowledgment of a sex preference. The results of this survey offer implications for research on the phenomena relating to sex preference.

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