CONCEPTIONS OF PRENATAL CARE AMONG SOMALI WOMEN IN SAN DIEGO

Authors

  • Kimberly Beine MD,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Kimberly Beine, md received her baccalaureate degree from Cornell Universal;, New York, and her md from the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine. This paper is based on an independent study project conducted while she was a third year medical student.

  • Judith Fullerton PHD, CNM,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Judith T. Fullerton, PhD, cnm, facnm is Adjunct Professor, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego. She received her BSN from Wayne State University, an MS and a certificate in nurse-midwifery from Columbia University, and a PhD in health education/health administration from Columbia University. Dr. Fullerton is a Fellow of the American College of Nurse Midwives. She was Chair of the Independent Study Project Committee.

  • Lawrence Palinkas PHD,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Lawrence Palinkas, PhD is Associate Professor, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego. Dr. Palinkas received his BA in anthropology from the University of California, San Diego. He is the Director of Research for the Division of Family Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, and was a member of the Independent Study Project Committee.

  • Bronwen Anders MD

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Bronwen Anders, md is Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Community Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, and Medical Director of the East County Community Clinic. Dr. Anders received a ba from Mount Holyoke College, New York, a master's in health administration from the University of Colorado Health Science Center, an MD from Tulane University, and a DTMH from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Dr. Anders was a member of the Independent Study Project Committee.


Address correspondence to Judith T. Fullerton, PhD, 7717 Canyon Point Lane, San Diego, CA 92126.

ABSTRACT

Studies have shown that culturally sensitive prenatal care improves access to and utilization of that care. Focus groups were used to explore the beliefs and attitudes toward prenatal care among Somali women in San Diego, particularly in regard to their perinatal experiences following immigration. The women were very well informed about healthy prenatal practices, including nutrition and exercise, and very compliant in following such practices, having found ways and means to accommodate these practices into their new American lifestyle. The women were generally pleased with the care that they have received in San Diego and tolerant of most diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The women preferred to be seen by a female doctor/health care practitioner who is informed about the female circumcision practiced in Somalia and who is conservative in the decision to perform cesarean section deliveries.

Ancillary