NEONATAL CONSIDERATIONS WHEN BIRTH OCCURS AT HOME

Authors

  • Marion L. Toepke CNM, BSN,

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    • Marion L. Toepke, received her BSN from Pacific Lutheran University in 1966. She completed the nurse-midwifery and family nurse practitioner programs at the Frontier Nursing Service in 1974. She has practiced in Oregon since 1975, providing full-scope care across birth settings: home, birth center, and hospital. She has been a contributing editor to Midwifery Today magazine since 1987.

  • Leah L. Albers CNM, DRPH

    Corresponding author
      Address correspondence to Leah Albers, University of New Mexico College of Nursing, Albuquerque, NM 87131–1061.
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    • Leah L. Albers received her nursing degrees from Vanderbilt University (BSN, 1971; MSN, 1974). She received a pediatric nurse practitioner certificate in 1972 from the University of Colorado Medical Center and completed her nurse-midwifery education at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 1977. She was in full-scope practice for 11 years. She completed the DrPH degree at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health in 1990 and is currently working in nurse-midwifery education at the University of New Mexico.


Address correspondence to Leah Albers, University of New Mexico College of Nursing, Albuquerque, NM 87131–1061.

ABSTRACT

Certified nurse-midwives who attend births at home have special responsibilities and need to maintain certain skills that are designed to promote neonatal well-being. These include careful screening prior to and during labor to be sure that only the lowest risk women attempt home birth, resuscitation skills more polished than those required in hospital settings, and a high degree of skill in evaluation of the newborn following birth.

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