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HOME BIRTH WITH CERTIFIED NURSE-MIDWIFE ATTENDANTS IN THE UNITED STATES

An Overview

Authors

  • Marsha E. Jackson CNM, MSN,

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    • Marsha E. Jackson received her undergraduate degree in nursing at Howard University in 1974 and her MSN in nurse-midwifery from Georgetown university in 1981. From 1981 to 1987 she had a solo home birth practice and worked with Cities-in-Schools, a single-site adolescent pregnancy program providing hospital births. She is co-founder, co-owner, and co-director of Birth Care & Women's Health, a CNM practice founded in 1987 that provides home birth services in Washington, DC, Virginia, and Maryland. Since 1992, BirthCare and Women's Health has also provided freestanding birth center services in Virginia. Ms. Jackson chairs the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Home Birth Committee.

  • Alice J. Bailes CNM, MSN

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    • Alice J. Bailes received her BFA in dance and theatre from New York University in 1970. She received her undergraduate degree in nursing at George Mason University in 1980 and her MSN in nurse-midwifery from Georgetown University in 1981. Since 1972, Ms. Bailes has worked in the home birth setting, first as a childbirth educator and later as a birth assistant for families birthing at home. From 1982 to 1987, she worked as a CNM with Family Birth Associates, a home birth service. Ms. Bailes is co-founder, co-owner, and co-director of BirthCare and Women's Health, a CNM practice founded in 1987 specializing in out-of-hospital births. Ms. Bailes is vice-chair of the ACNM's Home Birth Committee.


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ABSTRACT

The move of the birth site from home to hospital in the United States from 1800 through the early part of the 20th Century is described. The reemergence of home birth in the United States since the early 1960s and the evolution of nurse-midwifery care in the home birth setting are discussed. Misconceptions regarding home birth and a review of international literature documenting the safety of home birth are included. The need for prospective research on home birth is supported. A Home Birth Curriculum Guide developed by the Home Birth Committee of the American College of Nurse-Midwives is provided.

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