PRIMARY CARE FOR WOMEN: Cultural Competence in Primary Care Services

Authors

  • Jo-Anna L. Rorie CNM, MSN, MPH,

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    • Jo-Anna L. Rorie is an assistant professor and faculty member of the Nurse Midwifery Educationer and Maternal and Child Health Programs of the Boston University School of Public Health. She received her MSN and nurse-midwifery education from Yale University and her MPH from Harvard University School of Public Health. Ms. Rorie has extensive experience providing primary care for women, especially African American women at the [Text missing in PDF] Community Health Center in Roxbury, drug addicted women at the Neil J. Houston House in Boston and incarcerated women at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Framingham, Massachusetts.

  • Lisa L. Paine CNM, DRPH, FACNM,

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    • Lisa L. Paine is an associate professor and director of the Maternal and Child Health Program at the Boston University School of Public Health. She received her nurse midwifery education at the University of Utah and her public health education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Dr. Paine is currently developing curricula for multi-disciplinary maternal and child health leadership education that include the development of culturally competent systems of care for mothers and children. She has also provided executive direction for Parts 1 and 2 of the Journal of Nurse-Midwifery home Study program series on primary care for women.

  • Mary K. Barger CNM, MPH

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    • Mary K. Barger is an assistant professor and faculty member of the Nurse-Midwifery Education Program at the Boston University School of Public Health where the directs the program's academic and clinical curriculum development in primary care for women. She received her nurse-midwifery education and MPH from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Ms Barger has clinical experience with Middle Eastern populations in Jordan and Saudi Arabia Navajo Indians in New Mexico and Hispanic populations in southern California. Additionally Ms Barger has coordinated Parts 1 and 2 of the Journal of Nurse-Midwifery home study program series on primary care for women.


Address correspondence to Jo-Anna L. Rorie, CNM, MSN, MPH, Boston University School of Public Health. Maternal and Child Health Program. 80 E. Concord St., Room A 207, Boston. MA 02118.

ABSTRACT

The assessment of cultural competence in providing primary care services (or women is addressed Emphasis is placed on the ways in which cultural competency attainment can ensure the availability of key primary care components to all women, especially those from certain vulnerable populations and those who have specific primary health care needs, A cultural competence continuum is described that will assist providers in an assessment of their own cultural competency levels, as well as those of the service settings in which they practice. Six scenarios are provided, describing experiences at each level of the continuum that may hinder the development and delivery of effective primary care service interventions. Examples of ways in which nurse-midwives can provide leadership in the area of cultural competence in women's primary care are also included.

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