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FACTORS AFFECTING ACCESS TO PRENATAL CARE FOR U.S./MEXICO BORDER-DWELLING HISPANIC WOMEN

Authors

  • Angelica Zaid MD,

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      477 N. El Camino Real, Ste. A-300, Encinitas, CA 92024.
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    • Angelica Zaid received a BS in psychobiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an MD from the University of California, San Diego. She completed her residency in obstetrics/gynecology at Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix. This research was conducted as a medical student Independent Study Project.

  • Judith T. Fullerton CNM, PHD, FACNM,

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    • Judith T. Fullerton received a BSN from Wayne State University, an MS and certificate in nurse-midwifery from Columbia University, and the PhD in health education (health administration tract) from Temple University. Dr. Fullerton was adjunct professor, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, and is professor and associate dean for the Graduate Nursing Program, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. She was the chair of the Independent Study Project. Dr. Fullerton is a Fellow of the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  • Thomas Moore MD, FACOG

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    • Thomas Moore received an MD from Yale University. He is associate professor and acting chair, Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego. Dr. Moore was a member of the Independent Study Project Committee.


477 N. El Camino Real, Ste. A-300, Encinitas, CA 92024.

ABSTRACT

A study of attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors about prenatal care was conducted among Hispanic women who resided on the U.S.-Mexico border. As part of a larger study that included chart reviews of 752 mothers and postpartum interviews of 587 of these women, the 118 women who elected to deliver in the university-affiliated teaching hospital, rather than any of four participating private hospitals, were reviewed separately. This study sought to determine whether the prenatal care behaviors and obstetric outcomes experienced by this subset of women would contribute to any particular adverse impact on the teaching hospital, such as the need for additional intervention services. The most common barriers to prenatal care identified among women in the entire study were the same factors identified among women in the university hospital, including lack of financial means to pay for care, lack of information concerning where to obtain care, inadequate infrastructure of clinic services, sadness, and depression. Maternal and infant outcomes were generally favorable, even for women who did not receive any measure of prenatal care.

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