Get access

GROUP B STREPTOCOCCUS IN THE PERINATAL PERIOD A Review

Authors

  • Lee S. Clay CNM, MS

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Lee S. Clay received a bachelor of science in nursing from Duke University and her nurse-midwifery education at Columbia University. She is an associate editor for the Journal of Nurse-Midwifery and co-coordinator of the Media Reviews column. She is a clinical assistant professor at the Nurse-Midwifery Educational Program in the School of Health-Related Professions at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ.


Address correspondence to Lee S. Clay, cnm, ms, 64 Hance Rd., Fair Haven, NJ 07704.

ABSTRACT

Prior to the 1960s, little was known about morbidity and mortality in humans due to group B streptococcus (GBS). Since that time, a thorough understanding of the organism's potential has been developed. Of pregnant women, 20–30% are prenatal carriers of GBS and 40–75% of these mothers will transmit GBS to their neonates. However, the actual incidence of GBS disease in infants is one to three cases per 1,000 live births. Several risk factors for transmission and development of early-onset GBS disease have been identified. The understanding of late-onset disease is less clear. Many strategies have been investigated to find an optimal protocol to reduce significantly the incidence of GBS disease in a cost-effective manner. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recently made recommendations for prevention strategies against this disease.

Ancillary