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The Relationship of Ambulation in Labor to Operative Delivery

Authors

  • Leah L. Albers CNM, DrPH,

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      University of New Mexico College of Nursing, Nurse-Midwifery Program, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1061
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    • Leah L. Albers received her nursing degrees from Vanderbilt University (BSN, 1971; MSN, 1974). She studied nurse-midwifery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (1977). She was in full-scope practice for 11 years and then completed the DrPH degree at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health (1990). She is an associate professor at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing, and has a joint appointment in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine. She is actively involved in clinical midwifery research, and was the principal investigator for this project.

  • Deborah Anderson CNM, MN,

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    • Deborah Anderson received her BS from San Francisco State University (1980) and studied nurse-midwifery at Emory University (MN, 1984). She has been in full-scope practice since then and concurrently is an assistant clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences. She was the site coordinator for data collection at San Francisco General Hospital.

  • Leslie Cragin CNM, MS,

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    • Leslie Cragin received her nursing degree from Alverno College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (BSN, 1982). She studied nurse-midwifery at the UCSF/UCSD Intercampus Program and received her MS from the University of California at San Francisco (1986). She began nurse-midwifery practice at a birth center, and she is currently Director of the Nurse-Midwifery Service at San Francisco General Hospital.

  • Susan Moore Daniels CNM, MSN,

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    • Susan Moore Daniels received her undergraduate degree from the University of New Mexico (BSN, 1983), and her nurse-midwifery education at Yale University (MSN, 1988). She has been in full-scope practice for 8 years at Lovelace Health Systems in Albuquerque, NM. She was the midwifery service director at Lovelace for the past 5 years, and is now the midwifery research coordinator.

  • Christine Hunter CNM, MSN,

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    • Christine Hunter received her BSN degree from the University of California at San Francisco (1985) and her nurse-midwifery education at the University of Colorado (MSN, 1991). She has been a staff midwife in full-scope practice at Lovelace Health Systems since 1991, and has been a continual preceptor for basic and integration nurse-midwifery students. She was the site coordinator for data collection at Lovelace and is now the Midwifery Service Director.

  • Kay D. Sedler CNM, MN,

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    • Kay D. Sedler received her BSN from Murray State University (1969) and studied nurse-midwifery at Emory University (MN, 1979). She has been at the University of New Mexico (UNM) for 16 years and is Chief of the Nurse-Midwifery Division and a faculty member in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She coordinated data collection at UNM and data entry for the project.

  • Dusty Teaf MA

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    • Dusty Teaf received her degrees in sociology from the University of New Mexico (BA, 1981; MA, 1983). She has worked for 12 years as a computer analyst at the Computer and Information Research and Technology Department at the University of New Mexico. She assisted with data management and software applications for computer interface and all data analyses.


University of New Mexico College of Nursing, Nurse-Midwifery Program, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1061

ABSTRACT

An abbreviated version of the Nurse-Midwifery Clinical Data Set was used to gather data on all women (n = 3,049) who began intrapartum care with a nurse-midwife in three sites. Demographic information, intrapartum care, and outcomes were recorded. The association of ambulation in labor with operative delivery was examined in a low-risk sample (n = 1,678) of women who did not receive care measures (epidural anesthesia, oxytocin induction or augmentation) that preclude mobility in labor. Women who ambulated for a significant amount of time during labor (compared with those who did not ambulate) had half the rate of operative delivery (2.7% vs. 5.5%).

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