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A MODEL OF NURSE-MIDWIFE AND FAMILY PHYSICIAN COLLABORATIVE CARE IN A COMBINED ACADEMIC AND COMMUNITY SETTING

Authors

  • Patricia A. Payne CNM, MPH,

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    • Patricia A. Payne obtained her MPH at Johns Hopkins University in 1976 and received her midwifery education at the Medical University of South Carolina in 1986. She is Maternal and Child Health curriculum coordinator in the Department of Family Medicine at University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill. The curriculum is an evidenced-based focus on family-centered care that provides residents with learning opportunities for the use of nonpharmacologic pain relief in labor, breastfeeding support, and home visitation. Her clinical practice experience includes being a former director for a regional high-risk referral service, private practice as a certified nurse-midwife, and nursing/ midwifery and medical education.

  • Valerie J. King MD, MPH

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    • Valerie J. King completed her medical school and family medicine training at UNC Chapel Hill in North Carolina. This experience involved training with midwives in the United States and Scotland. She has an MPH in epidemiology from the School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She is a postdoctoral fellow in the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research and an attending physician in the Department of Family Medicine, UNC Chapel Hill. She also serves as medical director of Piedmont Women's Health Center, a freestanding childbirth center operated by a local community health center.


Department of Family Medicine, Campus Box 7595, Chapel Hill, NC 27599–7595.

ABSTRACT

Certified nurse-midwives and family physicians share a philosophy of family-centered maternity care. Collaboration between the two disciplines, however, has not been common. Collaboration can enhance the primary care and maternity care options available to clients of such collaborative practices. Advantages and barriers to collaboration for both types of practitioners, as well as suggestions for successful collaboration, are discussed.

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