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INTRAPARTUM HYPERTENSION IN A LOW-RISK OBSTETRIC POPULATION

Authors

  • Leah L. Albers CNM, DrPH, FACNM,

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    • Leah L. Albers received her nursing degrees from Vanderbilt University (BSN, 1971; MSN, 1974). She studied nurse-midwifery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (1977). She was in full-scope practice for 11 years and then completed the DrPH degree at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health (1990). She is an associate professor at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing and has a joint appointment in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine.

  • Barbara Overman CNM, PhD,

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    • Barbara Overman received her BSN degree from the University of Delaware (1983). She studied nurse-midwifery and completed the doctorate in Nursing at the University of Colorado (MSN, 1985; PhD, 1991). She also holds the MPH in Maternal and Child Health from the University of Pittsburgh (1979). She is an assistant professor at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing and is director of the Nurse-Midwifery Education Program.

  • Kay D. Sedler CNM, MN

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    • Kay D. Sedler received her BSN from Murray State University (1969) and studied nurse-midwifery at Emory University (MN, 1979). She has been at the University of New Mexico (UNM) for 17 years and is chief of the nurse-midwifery division in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine. She is serving as the American College of Nurse-Midwives Region V Representative.


Address correspondence to Leah Albers, CNM, DrPH, FACNM, University of New Mexico College of Nursing, Albuquerque, NM 87131–1061.

ABSTRACT

Hypertension is one of the more serious medical problems requiring special attention during labor. Clinical midwifery data were used to determine the incidence of and risk factors for intrapartum hypertension in a low-risk population of women who received care from certified nurse-midwives. Descriptive statistics are reported for demographic and clinical variables. Nulliparity and young maternal age were two important risk factors for onset of hypertension in labor. Body mass index, weight gain in pregnancy, and advanced maternal age, however, were not predictors. The impact of cultural factors and the style of care on the modification of risk conditions warrants further investigation.

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