MENTORING AND JOB SATISFACTION: Perceptions of Certified Nurse-Midwives

Authors

  • Christina Wiegert Cuesta CNM, MN,

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    • Christina W. Cuesta is a graduate of the nurse-midwifery program at the University of Florida, where she received her MSN. She completed her BS at SUNY-Binghamton in 1989.

  • Kathaleen C. Bloom CNM, PhD

    Corresponding author
      Address correspondence to Kathaleen C. Bloom, CNM, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Florida College of Nursing, 653–1 West 8th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209.
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    • Kathaleen C. Bloom is assistant professor at the University of Florida College of Nursing.


  • CNMs/CMs and midwives as used herein refer to those midwifery practitioners who are certified by the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) or the ACNM Certification Council, Inc.; midwifery refers to the profession as practiced in accordance with the standards promulgated by the ACNM.

Address correspondence to Kathaleen C. Bloom, CNM, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Florida College of Nursing, 653–1 West 8th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209.

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mentoring and job satisfaction among recently certified nurse-midwives. The Demographic Data Questionnaire, Job Satisfaction Survey, and Quality of Mentoring Tool were mailed to all first-year eligible members (N = 466) of the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM). A total of 317 surveys (68%) were included in the analysis. Sixty-five percent (n = 208) have had a mentor. Twenty-six (8%) had participated in the ACNM Mentoring Program and 33 (10%) had participated in a student mentoring program other than the ACNM Mentoring Program. The most frequently identified qualities of the mentoring relationship were model, supporter, envisioner, and investor. Eighty-one percent (n = 249) reported that they were satisfied with their current job. There was no significant relationship between stated job satisfaction and participation in a mentoring relationship. A significant, but low, correlation was found between stated job satisfaction and the quality of the mentoring relationship (r = .16, P = .03) and between scores on the Job Satisfaction Survey and Quality of Mentoring Tool (r = .14, P = .04).

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