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COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IN WOMEN'S HEALTH: Developing a Research Agenda

Authors

  • Patricia Aikins Murphy CNM, DrPH, FACNM,

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    • Patricia Aikins Murphy is an associate research scientist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a staff member of the Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research in Women's Health at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, in New York.

  • Fredi Kronenberg PhD,

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    • Fredi Kronenberg is a physiologist with a long-term interest in and research focus on women's health, in particular menopause. Her research on physiology and endocrinology of menopausal hot flashes has expanded to include alternative approaches, such as herbal medicine and traditional systems of medicine such as traditional Chinese medicine. She is the director of the Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research in Women's Health.

  • Christine Wade

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    • Christine Wade is the research manager at the Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research in Women's Health, one of thirteen NIH/NCCAM-funded specialty centers at universities across the nation. She coordinates multidisciplinary research and education projects in botanical medicine and women's health.


Research Manager, Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research in Women's Health, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, Box 75, New York, NY 10032.

ABSTRACT

Complementary and alternative medicine is becoming an established intervention modality within the contemporary health care system. Various forms of complementary and alternative medicine are used by patients and practitioners alike, including chiropractic, massage, botanical medicine, homeopathy, and energy therapies. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine was established within the National Institutes of Health to facilitate evaluation of these alternative therapies, establish an information clearinghouse, and promote research in the field. This article discusses several aspects of complementary and alternative medicine, relates them to women's health, and describes the need for a research agenda to evaluate the impact of the complementary and alternative medicine modalities used for important conditions affecting women.

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