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A NATIONAL SURVEY OF HERBAL PREPARATION USE BY NURSE-MIDWIVES FOR LABOR STIMULATION

Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Practice

Authors

  • Barbara L. McFarlin CNM, MS, RDMS,

    Associate Professor, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Barbara L. McFarlin is an associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at West Virginia University School of Medicine. She received her BSN in 1974 and MS in 1984 from the University of Illinois in Chicago.

  • Mary H. Gibson CNM, MSN,

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    • Mary H. Gibson received her MSN from Yale University in 1978 and her BA from Florida State University in 1970. She practiced as a faculty nurse midwife at Yale in 1979 and was subsequently on the faculty at the University of Vermont until 1991 as a staff nurse-midwife. She is on the faculty at West Virginia University School of Nursing.

  • Jann O'Rear CNM, MSN,

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    • Jann O'Rear is an instructor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at West Virginia University School of Medicine. She received her BSN in 1984 from the University of Maryland in Baltimore. She received her midwifery education at the Frontier School of Midwifery and Family Nursing, Kentucky in 1994. She received her MSN from Case Western Reserve University in 1995.

  • Patsy Harman CNM, MS

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    • Patsy Harman is in private practice in Morgantown, WV. She received her AD in 1982 from Hooking College, her BS in health care administration in 1984 from Joseph's College and in 1985 her MSN from University of Minnesota.


West Virginia University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, P.O. Box 9186, Morgantown, WV 26506–9186.

ABSTRACT

To document the use of herbal preparations for cervical ripening, induction, and augmentation of labor by certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and nurse-midwifery education programs, a national survey of 500 members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives was conducted. Forty eight nurse-midwifery education programs were also surveyed to determine whether they were formally or informally educating students in the use of herbal preparations for cervical ripening, induction, or augmentation of labor. The results of this study, a review of the literature, professional issues, and recommendations for clinical practice are presented in this article. Of 500 questionnaires mailed to ACNM members, 90 were returned from CNMs who used herbal preparations to stimulate labor and 82 were returned from CNMs who did not use herbal preparations to stimulate labor. Three questionnaires were excluded due to incomplete data or blank questionnaires.

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