MIDWIFERY IN THE 21ST CENTURY: Recommendations from the Pew Health Professions Commission/UCSF Center for the Health Professions 1998 Taskforce on Midwifery

Authors

  • Lisa L. Paine CNM, DrPH, FACNM,

    Corresponding author
      4Address correspondence to Lisa L. Paine, CNM, DrPH, FACNM, Boston University School of Public Health, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 715 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118–2526.
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    • 1Lisa L. Paine is Professor and Chair, Department of Maternal and Child Health at the Boston University School of Public Health, Boston. She received public health education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health and nurse-midwifery education at the University of Utah. Dr. Paine is currently a member of the Board of Trustees of the ACNM Foundation and an editorial consultant for the Journal of Nurse-Midwifery. In 1998, she served as Chairperson of the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) Center for the Health Professions Taskforce on Midwifery.

  • Catherine M. Dower JD,

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    • 2Catherine M. Dower is Health Law and Policy Analyst at the Center for the Health Professions, University of California, San Francisco, where in 1998 she served as Director of the USCF Center for Health Professions Taskforce on Midwifery. She also co-directed the Taskforce on Health Care Workforce Regulation of the Pew Health Professions Commission from 1996 to 1998. Ms. Dower, who received undergraduate and law degrees from the University of California, Berkeley, is licensed to practice law in the state of California. Other areas of interest include women's health and the impact of affirmative action on health status and health care.

  • Edward H. O'Neil PhD

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    • 3Edward H. O'Neil is an Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He also serves as the Co-Director of the Center for the Health Professions, a research, advocacy, and training institute created to stimulate change in health professions education. Since 1989, Dr. O'Neil has been the Executive Director of the Pew Health Professions Commission.


4Address correspondence to Lisa L. Paine, CNM, DrPH, FACNM, Boston University School of Public Health, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 715 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118–2526.

ABSTRACT

Unprecedented changes in the delivery and financing of health care have produced angst and opportunity, criticism, and innovation. To explore the effects of these market-driven changes on midwifery, the University of California at San Francisco Center for the Health Professions convened a Taskforce on Midwifery in 1998. Consisting of eight experts from across the country, the Taskforce was charged with exploring the impact of health care system developments on midwifery, and identifying issues facing the profession and the roles midwives play in women's health care. The Taskforce answered its charge by offering 14 recommendations related to midwifery practice, regulation, education, research, and policy. The recommendations incorporate the Taskforce vision that the midwifery model of care should be embraced by, and incorporated into, the health care system in order to make it available to all women and their families. Midwives, educators, collaborators, and policymakers can use the recommendations to develop curricula, practice sites, and laws for an improved health care system that fully includes midwives and encompasses the midwifery model of care. J Nurse Midwifery 1999;44:341–8 © 1999 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

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