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EVOLUTION AND CURRENT STATUS OF DIRECT-ENTRY MIDWIFERY EDUCATION, REGULATION, AND PRACTICE IN THE UNITED STATES, WITH EXAMPLES FROM WASHINGTON STATE

Authors

  • Jo Anne Myers-Ciecko MPH

    Corresponding author
      2Address correspondence to Jo Anne Myers-Ciecko, MPH, c/o Seattle Midwifery School, 2524 16th Ave. S. #300, Seattle, WA 98144. Email: jciecko@aol.com
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    • 1Jo Anne Myers-Ciecko, executive director of the Seattle Midwifery School, Seattle, Washington, since 1984, completed a masters degree in public health at the University of Washington in 1998. She participated in the seminars on midwifery education sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 1989 and 1990, and subsequently joined the national task force on certification convened by the North American Registry of Midwives. She was a founding member of the Midwifery Education Accreditation Council and currently is its treasurer. In 1998, she served as a member of the UCSF Center for the Health Professions Taskforce on Midwifery.


2Address correspondence to Jo Anne Myers-Ciecko, MPH, c/o Seattle Midwifery School, 2524 16th Ave. S. #300, Seattle, WA 98144. Email: jciecko@aol.com

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the re-emergence of direct-entry midwifery in the United States, and focuses specifically on the over 1,000 midwives nationwide who are licensed in the 16 states where direct-entry midwifery is legal and regulated, and/or certified by the North American Registry of Midwives; it does not focus on direct-entry midwives or nurse-midwives who are certified by the American College of Nurse-Midwives Certification Council, Inc. Professional developments of direct-entry midwives are highlighted, including the establishment of core competencies and articulation of values, the creation of a certification process, and development of education program accreditation. The current status of licensed midwives in Washington State, where state policies have supported the development of direct-entry midwifery and the integration of direct-entry midwives into managed care systems, is presented as one example of the evolution of professional direct-entry midwifery in this country. Additionally, recommendations from the UCSF Center for the Health Professions Taskforce on Midwifery, which address particular areas of concern for direct-entry midwives, are discussed. J Nurse Midwifery 1999;44:384–9 © 1999 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

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