Tracking temporal changes of bacterial community fingerprints during the initial stages of composting

Authors

  • Patrick D Schloss,

    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Riley-Robb Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
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    • 1

      Department of Plant Pathology, 1630 Linden Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

  • Anthony G Hay,

    1. Department of Microbiology, Riley-Robb Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
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  • David B Wilson,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Riley-Robb Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
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  • Larry P Walker

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Riley-Robb Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
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*Corresponding author. Fax: +1 (607) 255-4080. E-mail address: lpw1@cornell.edu

Abstract

The initial phase of composting is the most dynamic part of the process and is characterized by rapid increases in temperature, large swings in pH, and the degradation of simple organic compounds. DNA samples were taken from an active compost system to determine the microbial 16S rRNA gene sequences that were present during this phase. We observed two significant shifts in the composition of the microbial community, one between 12 and 24 h and the other between 60 and 72 h into the process using automated 16S–23S rRNA intergenic spacer amplification (ARISA). The 16S rRNA gene sequences adjoining the most common ARISA fragments at each time point were determined. We found that sequences related to lactic acid bacteria were most common during the first 60 h and Bacillus-type sequences were most common between 72 and 96 h. While the temperature increased steadily over the first 96 h, the pH dropped after 12 h and increased after 60 h correlating with the shift from Bacillus to lactic acid sequences and the later return to Bacillus-type sequences.

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