Relationship between left ventricular wall stress and ANP gene expression during the evolution of rapid ventricular pacing-induced heart failure in the dog

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Abstract

We have recently described a modified model of progressive rapid ventricular pacing-induced heart failure which evolves over a period of 38 days. To further characterize left ventricular remodeling during the progression of heart failure, we assessed left ventricular geometry, wall stress, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression and protein content during control conditions, asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction, and overt congestive heart failure (CHF). Although asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction was characterized by a significant increase in systolic and diastolic left ventricular dimension (+30% and +6%, respectively, P<0.05 each) and a marked increase in left ventricular systolic wall stress (+68%, P<0.01), left ventricular ANP gene expression was unchanged as compared to control. In contrast, strong left ventricular ANP gene expression (+449%, P<0.05) was observed during overt CHF in the absence of further significant increases in left ventricular systolic wall stress. The onset of strong left ventricular ANP gene expression was associated with increased ANP content (+88%, P<0.05) and left ventricular mass index (+13%, P<0.05). In contrast, left atrial ANP gene expression and left ventricular diastolic wall stress increased progressively during asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (+39%, P=n.s. and +131%, P<0.01) and overt CHF (+76% and +336% vs. control, P<0.01 each). Progressive rapid ventricular pacing is associated with the induction of left ventricular ANP gene expression and protein synthesis exclusively during overt CHF. The current studies provide new insight into the temporal pattern of ANP-activation and the disparity between left ventricular systolic wall stress and ANP-activation in a large animal model of progressive CHF.

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