NURSE-MIDWIVES' KNOWLEDGE AND PROMOTION OF LACTATIONAL AMENORRHEA AND OTHER NATURAL FAMILY-PLANNING METHODS FOR CHILD SPACING

Authors

  • Richard J. Fehring DNSc, RN,

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    • Richard J. Fehring is an associate professor in the Marquette University College of Nursing and Director of its Institute for Natural Family Planning. He provides professional natural family-planning services through the Covenant Health System.

  • Lisa Hanson CNM, DNSc,

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    • Lisa Hanson is an assistant professor in the Marquette University College of Nursing, Nurse-Midwifery Program. She has a full-scope faculty practice at the Nurse-Midwifery Center, Sinai Samaritan Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

  • Joseph B. Stanford MD, MSPH

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    • Joseph B. Stanford is an assistant professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of Utah and a certified natural family-planning medical consultant.


  • CNMs/CMs and midwives used herein refer to midwives who are certified by the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) or the ACNM Certification Counsel, Inc., and midwifery refers to the profession as practiced in accordance with the standards promulgated by the ACNM.

Associate Professor, Marquette University, College of Nursing, Emory T. Clark Hall, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881.

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to describe and assess certified nurse-midwives' (CNMs) knowledge and promotion of two modalities for child spacing, natural family-planning (NFP) and the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM). One thousand two hundred CNMs were randomly selected from a national membership list and mailed a 24-item questionnaire on NFP and LAM. Of the 514 respondents (42.8% return rate), 450 (87.5%) were currently practicing as CNMs. Respondents had an average age of 46 years, with an average of 10 years of practice. CNMs ranked NFP as the ninth most used and the eighth most effective family-planning method in their practice, with an average perceived method-effectiveness of 88% and use-effectiveness of 70%. Although most respondents felt somewhat prepared during their education program to provide NFP, only 22% would offer NFP as a family-planning option for child spacing.

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