Change in Maternal Concerns During the 6 Weeks Postpartum Period: A Study of Primiparous Mothers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Authors

  • Helen I. Lugina rn, rm, bscn, mn,

    Corresponding author
      Department of Women's and Children's Health, Section for International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Helen I. Lugina is a Registered Nurse/Midwife, Lecturer in Maternal and Child Health, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

  • Kyllike Christensson rn, rm, phd,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Kyllike Christensson is a Registered Nurse/Midwife, Associate Professor, Head of Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

  • Siriel Massawe md, mmed,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Siriel Massawe is a Senior Lecture, Head of Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

  • Lennarth Nystrom bsc, phd,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Lennarth Nystrom is a Senior Lecturer, Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.

  • Gunilla Lindmark md, phd

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Gunilla Lindmark is a Professor, Head of Section for International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.


Department of Women's and Children's Health, Section for International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to describe the postpartum concerns of primiparas. A cohort study included 79 mothers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Mothers sorted topics into worry, interest, and confidence. Trends of decreasing worry and increasing interest and confidence for baby-related and mother-related topics were observed from 1 to 6 weeks. At 1 week mothers worried about baby's eyes, respiration, temperature, safety, and crying; but, at 6 weeks only crying was a problem. Need for information was constant about general health, baby behavior, and care of the baby. At 1 week mothers worried about swollen perineum, and feeling tired and nervous. They wanted information about preventing hemorrhage and infection and taking care of the perineum, breasts, and nipples. Trends of increasing worry and decreasing confidence were observed with respect to family relationships. At 6 weeks, mothers worried about the husband/partner's reaction to themselves and to the baby. Confidence in relatives' reaction to themselves and the baby decreased. Being aware of the changes in the way concerns are expressed may guide nursing/midwifery interventions for mothers as to the content and timing.

Ancillary