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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE DURING PREGNANCY: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Authors

  • Lisa Espinosa CNM, MSN,

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    • Lisa Espinosa received her nursing degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1999 and received her master's degree in nurse-midwifery from Marquette University in May 2002.

  • Kathryn Osborne CNM, MSN

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    • Kathryn Osborne is a certified nurse-midwife in full-scope practice with the University of Wisconsin Nurse Midwifery Service—Milwaukee Campus. She is a clinical preceptor for nurse-midwifery students at Marquette University. She is also on the faculty of the Frontier School of Midwifery and Family Nursing (CNEP and CFNP).


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ABSTRACT

Domestic violence affects many women and their families. Although estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence during pregnancy vary, it is likely that most providers of women's health care will encounter pregnant women who experience domestic violence. The purpose of this article is to review research that has investigated associations between domestic violence during pregnancy and other demographic and lifestyle variables, as well as the literature regarding clinical assessment and intervention strategies.

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