Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescents

Authors

  • Elisabeth H. Quint MD,

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    • Elisabeth H. Quint, MD, is Clinical Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecology, at the University of Michigan Medical School. She is codirector of the clinic for pediatric and adolescent gynecology.

  • Yolanda R. Smith MD

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    • Yolanda R. Smith, MD, is Assistant Professor in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, at the University of Michigan Medical School. She is codirector of the clinic for pediatric and adolescent gynecology.


Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan Health System, L4000 Women's Hospital, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0276.

Abstract

Menarche is an important event during adolescence. For most girls, it marks completion of puberty and the onset of reproductive capability. Menarche usually occurs when both breast and pubic hair development are at Tanner stage 4. Menstrual problems are common during adolescence due to slow maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and can last 2 to 5 years after menarche. Although most problems are explained by anovulation, other causes must be considered and excluded in a logical and cost-effective manner. Frequently, the bleeding problems observed in adolescence require evaluation and intervention.

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