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The Transition to Web-Based Education: Enhancing Access to Graduate Education for Women's Health Providers

Authors

  • Melissa D. Avery CNM, PhD,

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    • Melissa D. Avery, CNM, PhD, FACNM, is Associate Professor and Director of the Nurse-Midwifery Program at the University of Minnesota, School of Nursing, and participates in full-scope practice with HealthPartners nurse-midwifery service.

  • Debbie Ringdahl CNM, MS,

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    • Debbie Ringdahl, CNM, MS, is a Teaching Specialist at the University of Minnesota, Nurse-Midwifery Program. She practices midwifery at the Fair-view Riverside Women's Clinic.

  • Catherine Juve RN, CNP, PhD,

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    • Catherine Juve, RN, CNP, PhD, is a Senior Teaching Specialist and coordinator of the Women's Health Nurse Practitioner program in the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. She practices as a WHNP at the Family Tree Clinic in St. Paul, MN.

  • Peg Plumbo CNM, MS

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    • Peg Plumbo, CNM, MS, is an instructor in the Nurse-Midwifery Program at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. She practices with the HealthEast Midwives in St. Paul, MN.


Melissa D. Avery, CNM, PhD, Nurse-Midwifery Program, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver Dens-ford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455.

Abstract

Nurse-midwives and women's health nurse practitioners have a long history as positive change agents in health care as well as education. This article chronicles the transition of a traditional face-to-face nurse-midwife and women's health nurse practitioner graduate curriculum to a Web-based format with campus seminars and clinical laboratories. This change was made to increase access to these graduate programs. A total of 20 courses, including both graduate core and specialty courses, was converted to the Web-based format over a 3-year period. Practical considerations for implementing a similar program, including faculty development and support, student orientation and ongoing support, development of a learning community, and time management, are discussed. The importance of listening to student feedback and partnering with them as the program continues to develop is emphasized as a key element of program evaluation and improvement.

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