Sensitivity to microcystins: A comparative study in human cell lines with and without multidrug resistance phenotype

Authors

  • Ana Paula Souza De Votto,

    1. Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Fundação Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    2. Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Fisiologia Animal Comparada, FURG, Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Viviane Plasse Renon,

    1. Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Fundação Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • João Sarkis Yunes,

    1. Departamento de Química, Unidade de Pesquisa em Cianobactérias, FURG, Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Vivian Mary Rumjanek,

    1. Laboratório de Imunologia Tumoral, Departamento de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro 21941-590, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Márcia Alves Marques Capella,

    1. Laboratório de Fisiologia Renal, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Vivaldo Moura Neto,

    1. Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Departamento de Anatomia, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marta Sampaio de Freitas,

    1. Centro Biomédico, Departamento de Farmacologia e Psicobiologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UEFRJ), Rio de Janeiro 20551-030, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Laura Alicia Geracitano,

    1. Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Fundação Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    2. Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Fisiologia Animal Comparada, FURG, Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • José María Monserrat,

    1. Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Fundação Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    2. Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Fisiologia Animal Comparada, FURG, Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gilma Santos Trindade

    Corresponding author
    1. Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Fundação Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
    2. Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Fisiologia Animal Comparada, FURG, Rio Grande 96201-900, Brazil
      Corresponding author. Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Fundação Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Campus Carreiros, Avenida Italia, km 8, Rio Grande 96201-900, RS, Brazil. Tel.: +55 53 3233 6855; fax: +55 53 3233 6850. gilma@octopus.furg.br
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author. Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Fundação Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Campus Carreiros, Avenida Italia, km 8, Rio Grande 96201-900, RS, Brazil. Tel.: +55 53 3233 6855; fax: +55 53 3233 6850. gilma@octopus.furg.br

Abstract

Multidrug resistance (MDR) is an obstacle in cancer treatment. An understanding of how tumoral cells react to oxidants can help us elucidate the cellular mechanism involved in resistance. Microcystins are cyanobacteria hepatotoxins known to generate oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity to microcystins of human tumoral cell lines with (Lucena) and without (K562) MDR phenotype. Endpoints analyzed were effective microcystins concentration to 50% of exposed cells (EC50), antioxidant enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, and tubulin content. Lucena were more resistant and showed lower DNA damage than K562 cells (P < 0.05). Although microcystins did not alter catalase activity, a higher mean value was observed in Lucena than in K562 cells. Lucena cells also showed lower ROS concentration and higher tubulin content. The higher metabolism associated with the MDR phenotype should increase ROS concentration and make for an improved antioxidant defense against the toxic effects of microcystins.

Ancillary