The plasmid encoding HSP47 enhances collagen expression and promotes skin wound healing in an alloxan-induced diabetic model

Authors

  • Zuolin Wang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Middle Yanchang Road No. 399, Shanghai 200072, PR China
      Tel./fax: +86 02166524025. E-mail addresses: zuolin@tongji.edu.cn
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lin Li

    1. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Middle Yanchang Road No. 399, Shanghai 200072, PR China
    Search for more papers by this author

Tel./fax: +86 02166524025. E-mail addresses: zuolin@tongji.edu.cn

Abstract

The objective of this work was initially to investigate the effects on skin wound healing process by local injection of HSP47 recombinant plasmid in an alloxan-induced diabetic rat model and assess the possibility and utility of gene therapy based on HSP47 plasmid to improve the diabetic skin wound healing. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with alloxan (120 mg/kg) to induce diabetes. The fragment containing the rat 47 kDa heat shock protein (HSP47) gene lacking its own promoter was cloned into plasmids containing a promoter and green fluorescent protein (GFP). The resulting gene constructs were first tested in vitro using 3T3 fibroblast cell line and subsequently in vivo after inducing wounds with alloxan in diabetic rats. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative fluorescent RT-PCR, and Western blotting 3–5 days after plasmid injection were performed to measure the expression changes of HSP47 and collagen I. The results demonstrate an increase of HSP47 levels in vitro in 3T3 fibroblast cells and in vivo in diabetic rat after treatment with plasmids expressing HSP47. The level of collagen I around the wound during the repair process was higher in the treated group than that in the control group, indicating that the constructs may have use in human gene therapy in cases of impaired skin wound healing in diabetes.

Ancillary