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Inhibition of new vessel growth in mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization by adiponectin peptide II

Authors

  • Valeriy V. Lyzogubov,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, Pat & Willard Walker Eye Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
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  • Ruslana G. Tytarenko,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, Pat & Willard Walker Eye Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
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  • Sushma Thotakura,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Tito Viswanathan,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
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  • Nalini S. Bora,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, Pat & Willard Walker Eye Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
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  • Puran S. Bora

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, Pat & Willard Walker Eye Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
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Tel: +1 501 686 6620; fax: +1 501 686 8316. E-mail addresses: pbora@uams.edu

Abstract

We have investigated the effect of adiponectin (APN) peptide II on new vessel growth in mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or wet type age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with APN peptide II, control peptide, or PBS on day 1–7 or day 5–14. APN, AdipoR1, PCNA, and VEGF localization was investigated using confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR. APN peptide II decreased the relative area of FITC-dextran perfused vessels by 4-fold, PCNA expression by 3-fold, and the number of PCNA stained HUVEC and MAVEC cells by 38 and 46%, respectively. We concluded that APN peptide II inhibits CNV size on days 7 and 14 by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. APN peptide II may have therapeutic potential to inhibit CNV or wet AMD.

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