Are emotion regulation skills related to adjustment among people with chronic pain, independent of pain coping?

Authors

  • M. Agar-Wilson,

    1. Key Laboratory of Cognition & Personality, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
    2. Department of Psychology, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
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  • T. Jackson

    Corresponding author
    1. The Cairns Institute, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
    • Key Laboratory of Cognition & Personality, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
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  • Funding sources

    none

  • Conflicts of interests

    None declared

Correspondence

Todd Jackson

Key Laboratory of Cognition & Personality, Southwest University, Chongqing 715400, PR China. Tel.: +86 23 68252234; fax: +86 23 6836797561.

E-mail: Todd.Jackson@jcu.edu.au

Abstract

Although emotion regulation capacities have been linked to adjustment among people with chronic pain, researchers have yet to determine whether these capacities are related to functioning independent of established facets of pain coping. The present study was designed to address this gap. A sample 128 Australian adults with chronic pain (44 men, 84 women) completed self-report measures of adjustment (quality of life, negative affect, and pain-related disability), pain coping, and features of emotion regulation (emotion appraisal, perceived efficacy in emotion regulation, emotion utilization). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that efficacy in emotion regulation was related to quality of life and reduced negative affect even after statistically controlling for effects of other measures of adjustment, pain coping efficacy, and pain coping. Conversely, features of emotion regulation did not improve the prediction model for pain-related disability. Findings suggest emotion regulation capacities may have a unique role in the prediction of specific facets of adjustment among people with chronic pain.

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