The American College of Nurse-Midwives' Dream Becomes Reality: The Division of Accreditation

Authors

  • Betty Watts Carrington CNM, EdD,

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      Betty Watts Carrington, CNM, EdD, FACNM, 119–31 220 Street, Cambria Heights, NY 11411. E-mail: bjwcarrington@netscape.net
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    • Betty Watts Carrington, CNM, EdD, FACNM, has served in several capacities in the American College of Nurse-Midwives, most recently as Chair of the Division of Accreditation from June 1999 to June 2004.

  • Helen Varney Burst CNM, MSN, DHL (Hon.)

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    • Helen Varney Burst, CNM, MSN, DHL (Hon.), FACNM, has served in several capacities in the American College of Nurse-Midwives, including Chair of the Division of Accreditation from 1991 to May 1999.


Betty Watts Carrington, CNM, EdD, FACNM, 119–31 220 Street, Cambria Heights, NY 11411. E-mail: bjwcarrington@netscape.net

ABSTRACT

Recognized continuously by the US Department of Education since 1982 as a specialized accrediting agency, the American College of Nurse-Midwives' Division of Accreditation (DOA) accredits not only nurse-midwifery education programs at the postbaccalaureate or higher academic level as certificate and graduate programs for registered nurses (RNs), but also precertification programs for professional midwives from other countries who are licensed as RNs in the United States. The DOA also accredits midwifery education programs for non-nurses at the postbaccalaureate or higher academic level as certificate and graduate programs, and precertification programs for professional midwives from other countries. The accreditation process is a voluntary activity involving both nurse-midwifery and/or midwifery education programs and the DOA. Present plans include another expansion of recognition: to become an institutional accreditation agency for independent and proprietary schools and to continue as a programmatic accrediting agency. Since its inception, the accreditation process has been viewed as a positive development in nurse-midwifery education.

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