Get access

The Psychological Effects of Aromatherapy-Massage in Healthy Postpartum Mothers

Authors

  • Masumi Imura CNM, MSN,

    Corresponding author
      Masumi Imura, Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongoh, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–0033, Japan. E-mail: imurasue@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Masumi Imura, CNM, PHN, IBCLC, MSN, is a doctoral candidate of the Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo.

  • Hanako Misao CNM, PhD,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Hanako Misao, CNM, PHN, MSN, PhD, is a chief researcher of the nursing research division at the Clinical Practice Evaluation and Research Center of St. Luke's Life Science Institute (St. Luke's International Hospital), Tokyo.

  • Hiroshi Ushijima MD, PhD

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Hiroshi Ushijima, MD, PhD, is Professor of the Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, at the University of Tokyo, Tokyo.


Masumi Imura, Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongoh, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–0033, Japan. E-mail: imurasue@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Abstract

This study examined the effect of aromatherapy-massage in healthy postpartum mothers. A quasi-experimental between-groups design was used. Mothers who received aromatherapy-massage were compared with a control group who received standard postpartum care. Thirty-six healthy, first-time mothers with vaginal delivery of a full-term, healthy infant participated in this study. Sixteen mothers received a 30-minute aromatherapy-massage on the second postpartum day; 20 mothers were in the control group. All mothers completed the following four standardized questionnaires before and after the intervention: 1) Maternity Blues Scale; 2) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; 3) Profile of Mood States (POMS); and 4) Feeling toward Baby Scale. In the aromatherapy-massage group, posttreatment scores significantly decreased for the Maternity Blues Scale, the State-Anxiety Inventory, and all but one of the Profile of Mood States subscales. Posttreatment scores in the intervention group significantly increased in Profile of Mood States-Vigor subscale and the Approach Feeling toward Baby subscale. Scores in the intervention group significantly decreased in Conflict Index of Avoidance/Approach Feeling toward Baby subscale. Our results suggest that aromatherapy-massage might be an effective intervention for postpartum mothers to improve physical and mental status and to facilitate mother-infant interaction.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary