Survey of Connecticut Nurse-Midwives

Authors

  • Margaret L. Holland MS,

    Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author
    • Margaret L. Holland, MS is a predoctoral student in Health Services Research and Policy at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY.

  • Eliza S. Holland CNM, MSN

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Eliza S. Holland, CNM, MSN, is in clinical practice in New Haven, Connecticut, and is co-chairman for the Connecticut chapter of the ACNM.


Margaret L. Holland, MS, Department of Community & Preventive Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 644, Rochester, NY 14642. E-mail: margaret_holland@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

Descriptive data on nurse-midwifery income, workload, job definitions, employment benefits, and clinical practices are limited. Information about nurse-midwifery practice today is important for the growth of the profession and for future policy initiatives. A survey of nurse-midwives in Connecticut was conducted in 2005. This article reports state-specific data about income, workload, job definitions, employment benefits, and clinical issues, such as vaginal birth after cesarean. Full-time midwives in Connecticut worked an average of 77 hours per week, had a mean salary of $79,554, and 87% had on-call responsibilities. A “typical” Connecticut midwife had an “average” full-time work week consisting of two 24-hour call days and three 7-hour office days, seeing 19 to 24 patients per office day. Most held Master of Science in Nursing degrees, worked in physician-owned practices, and attended births in hospitals or medical centers. Health insurance, paid sick time, and retirement plans were offered to most respondents. Almost all respondents provide gynecologic, antepartum, and postpartum care, but few offer newborn care. There is significant variation in restrictions on midwives offering vaginal birth after cesarean and on length of scheduled appointments. Data on expanded practices, such as first-assisting caesarean sections and endometrial biopsies, are reported for the first time.

Ancillary