Virtual Patient Training to Improve Reproductive Health Care for Women With Intellectual Disabilities

Authors

  • Sara E. Boyd MS,

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    • Sara E. Boyd, MS, completed her undergraduate degree in Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She completed her MS in Counseling Psychology and her certificate in Developmental Disabilities at the University of Kentucky. She is currently completing the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

  • Carla L. Sanders RN, MS,

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    • Carla L. Sanders, RN, MS, completed her MS in Rehabilitation Counseling, as well as a Certificate in Developmental Disabilities, at the University of Kentucky. She is currently pursuing her Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Degree at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

  • Harold L. Kleinert EdD,

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    • Harold L. Kleinert, EdD, completed his undergraduate degree in Humanities from the University of Louisville. He completed his MA in Special Education at the University of Minnesota and obtained his EdD in Special Education (with an emphasis upon Severe Disabilities) at the University of Kentucky. He is currently the Executive Director of the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

  • Marlene B. Huff LCSW, PhD,

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    • Marlene B. Huff, LCSW, PhD, completed her undergraduate degree in Psychology, her MSW, and her PhD at the University of Kentucky. She currently serves as Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY.

  • Sharon Lock RN, PhD,

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    • Sharon Lock, RN, PhD, completed her PhD at the University of South Carolina and is currently a Graduate Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

  • Stephanie Johnson RN, BC, MSN,

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    • Stephanie Johnson, RN, BC, MSN, completed her undergraduate degree in Nursing at Capital University. She completed her MSN at Bellarmine University and attained her Post Graduate Certificate in Nursing Education/Curriculum Development from Kent State University. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Morehead State University, Morehead, KY.

  • Kim Clevenger RN, MSN,

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    • Kim Clevenger, RN, MSN, completed her undergraduate degree in Psychology at Morehead State University. She completed her MSN at Bellarmine University and is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Morehead State University, Morehead, KY.

  • Nathania A. Bush RN, MSN,

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    • Nathania A. Bush, RN, MSN, completed her undergraduate degree in Nursing and her MSN at Eastern Kentucky University. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Morehead State University, Morehead, KY.

  • Eileen Van Dyke MPS, PA-C,

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    • Eileen Van Dyke, PA-C, MPS, is currently an Assistant Professor in the College of Health Sciences Division of Physician Assistant Studies at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

  • Tara L. Clark RN, MSN

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    • Tara L. Clark, RN, MSN, completed her undergraduate degree in Nursing at Eastern Kentucky University. She obtained her MSN at Vanderbilt University and is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Morehead State University, Morehead, KY.


Sara E. Boyd, MS, Human Development Institute, 8 Mineral Industries Bldg., University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506. E-mail: saraeboyd@mac.com

Abstract

A multimedia virtual patient module, involving the case of a young woman with mild intellectual disabilities with a complaint of diffuse abdominal pain, was developed as a clinical training tool for students in health care professions. Primary objectives following use of the module included improved knowledge and reduced perception of difficulty in treating women's health patients with intellectual disabilities. The module was developed using an iterative, collaborative process of a core development team that included medical professionals, multimedia specialists, the parent of a child with intellectual disability, and a disability advocate. Over the course of the module, students were required to identify appropriate and effective clinician–patient interactions in addition to relevant medical and developmental concerns for this patient population. Pilot data from a sample of nursing, physician assistant, and medical students suggest that the module is an effective tool for both improving students' knowledge and reducing their perception of difficulty in providing care to women's health patients with intellectual disabilities.

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