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Contemporary Childbirth Education Models

Authors

  • Deborah S. Walker CNM, DNSc, WHNP-BC, FNP-BC,

    Corresponding author
    1. Deborah S. Walker, CNM, DNSc, WHNP-BC, FNP-BC, FACNM, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University College of Nursing and School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, and the Graduate Program Director of the Nurse-Midwife and Women's Health Nurse Practitioner graduate education specialties. Dr. Walker has been active in nursing and midwifery practice, research, and education for more than 30 years. She is a member of the Board of Directors of Lamaze Family Center in Ann Arbor, MI, and was educated as an International Childbirth Education Association Childbirth Educator.
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  • Joan M. Visger CNM, MSN,

    1. Joan M. Visger, CNM, MSN, is a doctoral student at Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, MI. She is certified as a Lamaze instructor and is a HypnoBirthing – The Mongan Method Practitioner.
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  • Debra Rossie CNM, MSN

    1. Debra Rossie, CNM, MSN, is a lecturer in the Wayne State University College of Nursing Nurse-Midwifery and Women's Health Nurse Practitioner specialties, Detroit, MI. She has been a certified nurse-midwife for more than 12 years and is in private practice in southeastern Michigan.
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Wayne State University, College of Nursing and School of Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology, 5557 Cass Ave., Rm. 248, Detroit, MI 48202. E-mail: dswalker@wayne.edu

Abstract

Since the 1960s, childbirth education advocates have attempted to persuade pregnant women that educational preparation for labor and birth is an essential component of the transition to motherhood. Initially, pregnant women who were seeking unmedicated births as a refuge from the inhumane childbirth treatments of the mid-20th century embraced this view. However, with the changing childbirth climate, including a growing preference for medicated birth, scheduled inductions, and cesarean sections, attendance has diminished and childbirth education finds itself at a crossroads. Commonly used childbirth education models/organizations and several new emerging models along with the available research literature and recommendations for clinical practice and research are presented.

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