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Obstetric Triage: Models and Trends in Resident Education By Midwives

Authors

  • Diane J. Angelini CNM, NEA-BC, EdD, FACNM, FAAN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Clinical Associate Professor at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology
    2. Director of Midwifery, Women and Infants' Hospital, Providence, RI
      Clinical Associate Professor, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Director of Midwifery, Women and Infants' Hospital, Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, 101 Dudley St., Providence, RI 02905. E-mail: dangelini@wihri.org
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  • Elizabeth Stevens CNM, MSN, MPH,

    1. Staff Midwife in the Women's Evaluation and Treatment Unit
    2. Clinical Faculty for Tufts Medical School on the campus of Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA
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  • Amy MacDonald CNM, MSN,

    1. Director of the Duke Midwifery Service, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
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  • Sharon Wiener CNM, MPH,

    1. Associate Clinical Professor and a Midwife at the University of California, San Francisco, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, San Francisco, CA
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  • Bridget Wieczorek CNM, MSN

    1. Clinical Instructor at University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology and Director of the Midwifery Service in Omaha, NE
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Clinical Associate Professor, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Director of Midwifery, Women and Infants' Hospital, Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, 101 Dudley St., Providence, RI 02905. E-mail: dangelini@wihri.org

Abstract

Four models of resident education in obstetric triage with midwifery faculty consultants are presented. Common trends in the structure and function of these models are reviewed. The four models represent diverse settings where midwives serve as clinical teachers primarily for first-year obstetric residents and residents from other subspecialties. Each model supports a growing number of midwives working in the triage setting, functioning as both teacher and consultant for new residents. This expanded midwifery teaching role extends beyond labor assessment to include a wide range of common obstetric and gynecologic conditions in the triage setting. Additional advantages include the ability of the midwife to bill for triage services and to provide a safety net to decrease medical errors which, in a busy triage unit, occur most often during patient transfers.

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