A Tool for Modeling Strategic Decisions in Cell Culture Manufacturing

Authors

  • Suzanne S. Farid,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, UK
    • The Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, UK
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  • Joana L. Novais,

    1. The Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, UK
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  • Srinivas Karri,

    1. The Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, UK
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  • John Washbrook,

    1. Department of Computer Science, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
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  • Nigel J. Titchener-Hooker

    1. The Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, UK
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Abstract

The development of a prototype tool for modeling manufacturing in a biopharmaceutical plant is discussed. A hierarchical approach to modeling a manufacturing process has been adopted to confer maximum user flexibility. The use of this framework for assessing the impact of manufacturing decisions on strategic technical and business indicators is demonstrated via a case study. In the case study, which takes the example of a mammalian cell culture process delivering a therapeutic for clinical trials, the dynamic modeling tool indicates how manufacturing options affect the demands on resources and the associated manufacturing costs. The example illustrates how the decision-support software can be used by biopharmaceutical companies to investigate the effects of working toward different strategic goals on the cost-effectiveness of the process, prior to committing to a particular option.

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