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Perfusion Culture of Hybridoma Cells for Hyperproduction of IgG2a Monoclonal Antibody in a Wave Bioreactor-Perfusion Culture System

Authors

  • Ya-Jie Tang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Chemical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Massachusetts 02139
    2. College of Bioengineering, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 China
    • Chemical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Massachusetts 02139. Fax: +86–27–88015108
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  • Ryo Ohashi,

    1. Chemical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Massachusetts 02139
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  • Jean-François P. Hamel

    1. Chemical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Massachusetts 02139
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Abstract

A novel wave bioreactor-perfusion culture system was developed for highly efficient production of monoclonal antibody IgG2a (mAb) by hybridoma cells. The system consists of a wave bioreactor, a floating membrane cell-retention filter, and a weight-based perfusion controller. A polyethylene membrane filter with a pore size of 7 μm was floating on the surface of the culture broth for cell retention, eliminating the need for traditional pump around flow loops and external cell separators. A weight-based perfusion controller was designed to balance the medium renewal rate and the harvest rate during perfusion culture. BD Cell mAb Medium (BD Biosciences, CA) was identified to be the optimal basal medium for mAb production during batch culture. A control strategy for perfusion rate (volume of fresh medium/working volume of reactor/day, vvd) was identified as a key factor affecting cell growth and mAb accumulation during perfusion culture, and the optimal control strategy was increasing perfusion rate by 0.15 vvd per day. Average specific mAb production rate was linearly corrected with increasing perfusion rate within the range of investigation. The maximum viable cell density reached 22.3 × 105 and 200.5 × 105 cells/mL in the batch and perfusion culture, respectively, while the corresponding maximum mAb concentration reached 182.4 and 463.6 mg/L and the corresponding maximum total mAb amount was 182.4 and 1406.5 mg, respectively. Not only the yield of viable cell per liter of medium (32.9 × 105 cells/mL per liter medium) and the mAb yield per liter of medium (230.6 mg/L medium) but also the mAb volumetric productivity (33.1 mg/L·day) in perfusion culture were much higher than those (i.e., 22.3 × 105 cells/mL per liter medium, 182.4 mg/L medium, and 20.3 mg/L·day) in batch culture. Relatively fast cell growth and the perfusion culture approach warrant that high biomass and mAb productivity may be obtained in such a novel perfusion culture system (1 L working volume), which offers an alternative approach for producing gram quantity of proteins from industrial cell lines in a liter-size cell culture. The fundamental information obtained in this study may be useful for perfusion culture of hybridoma cells on a large scale.

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