Trauma symptoms in bone marrow transplant survivors: The role of nonmedical life events

Authors

  • Katherine N. Duhamel,

    Corresponding author
    1. Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    • Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1130, New York, New York 10029-6574
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  • Meredith Y. Smith,

    1. Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Suzanne M. Johnson Vickberg,

    1. Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Esperanza Papadopoulos,

    1. Bone Marrow Transplantation Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
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  • Jamie Ostroff,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
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  • Gary Winkel,

    1. Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Sharon Manne,

    1. Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cheltenham, Pennsylvania
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  • William H. Redd

    1. Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, Derald H. Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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Abstract

This cross-sectional study investigated the association of trauma-related symptomatology and recent life events in cancer survivors following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). One hundred adults averaging 4.4 years post-BMT were interviewed. Participants reported their trauma-related symptomatology regarding cancer and its treatment as well as the number and valence of recent life events. Results indicated that the more negative life events a person experienced, the greater his/her trauma-related symptomatology. The association of traumarelated symptomatology with positive events varied by the individuals' level of physical functioning. For individuals with poorer physical functioning, higher levels of trauma-related symptomatology were associated with a greater number of positive events, suggesting the greater vulnerability of these individuals to any type of change in their life.

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