Propranolol for reemergent posttraumatic stress disorder following an event of retraumatization: A case study

Authors

  • Fletcher Taylor,

    Corresponding author
    1. Rainier Associates, Tacoma, Washington
    2. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Washington, District of Columbia
    • 5909 Orchard West, Tacoma, Washington 98467
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Larry Cahill

    1. Department of Neurobiology and Behavior and Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, University of Washington, Washington, District of Columbia
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

This case report concerns a 44-year-old woman who experienced 5 similar motor vehicle accidents, the last 3 causing severe PTSD episodes of over 6 months each, despite multiple pharmacotherapies. Following a 6th accident, severe PTSD symptoms reemergcd. Forty-eight hours after this trauma, propranolol (60 mg) orally, twice a day (1.75 mg/kg/day) was begun, and the PTSD symptoms were rapidly and markedly reduced. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Rating Scale score was reduced from an initial 86 to 56 by 11 days posttrauma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effects of propranolol treatment on reemergent PTSD symptoms. Propranolol may be particularly efficacious in the prevention of initial or reemergent PTSD symptoms.

Ancillary