Mental health needs of crime victims: Epidemiology and outcomes

Authors

  • Dean G. Kilpatrick,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
    • National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 165 Cannon Street, P.O. Box 250852, Charleston, South Carolina 29425
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ron Acierno

    1. National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This paper draws heavily from several recent publications that D.G.K. authored, co-authored, or helped prepare:

    Acierno, R., Kilpatrick, D. G., & Resnick, H. S. (1999). Posttraumatic stress disorder: Prevalence, risk factors and comorbidity relative to criminal victimization. In P. Saigh & D. Bremner (Eds.), Posttraumatic stress disorder: A comprehensive approach to research and treatment (pp. 44–68). New York: Allyn & Bacon.

    Kilpatrick, D. G. (1999a). Mental health needs. In G. Coleman, M. Gaboury, M. Murray, & A. Seymour (Eds.), 1999 national victim assistance academy training text (pp. 6.1–6.20). Washington. DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

    Kilpatrick, D. G. (1999b). Sexual assault. In G. Coleman, M. Gaboury, M. Murray, & A. Seymour (Eds.), 1999 national victim assistance academy training text (pp. 6.1–6.20). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

    U.S. Department of Justice. Office for Victims of Crime. (1997). The mental health community. In New directions from the field: Victim's rights and services for the 21st century (pp. 219–247). Washington, DC: Author.

    Hanson, R. F., Kilpatrick, D. G., Falsetti, S. A., Resnick, H. S., & Weaver, T. (1995). Violent crime and mental health. In J. R. Freedy & S. E. Hobfoll (Eds.), Traumatic stress: From theory to practice (pp. 129–161). New York: Plenum.

Abstract

This paper reviews epidemiological estimates of criminal victimization derived largely from nationally based studies in the United States. Origins of conflicting rates and prevalences are explained in terms of varying methodology. Risk factors for victimization, including age, race, gender, and disability, are also outlined, and derived from both national and geographically limited U.S.-based studies. Finally, mental health outcomes of violence are documented, with conclusions drawing on both national and regionally specific studies. These outcomes focus on posttraumatic stress disorder, but also include depression, substance abuse, and panic.

Ancillary