Effects of mode of writing on emotional narratives

Authors

  • Chris R. Brewin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cognition Emotion and Trauma Group, Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, England
    • Cognition Emotion and Trauma Group, Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, England
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  • Hayley Lennard

    1. Cognition Emotion and Trauma Group, Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, England
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Abstract

The authors hypothesized that writing longhand about a stressful experience, compared to typing, arouses greater negative emotion. Eighty college students were randomly assigned to describe either a neutral or stressful topic by typing or writing longhand, in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Students describing the stressful topic, compared to the neutral topic, wrote for a longer period, used more words, and reported greater negative and less positive affect. Consistent with prediction, writing about a stressful experience longhand induced greater negative affect than typing, and led to more self-rated disclosure. These findings suggest a method whereby therapists can help patients control their levels of negative affect when producing a trauma narrative.

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