Assimilation of ozone profiles from the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer-II: Study of Antarctic ozone

Authors

  • Ivanka Stajner,

    1. Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
    2. Also at Science Applications International Corporation, Beltsville, Maryland, USA.
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  • Krzysztof Wargan,

    1. Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
    2. Also at Science Applications International Corporation, Beltsville, Maryland, USA.
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  • Lang-Ping Chang,

    1. Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
    2. Also at Science Applications International Corporation, Beltsville, Maryland, USA.
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  • Hiroo Hayashi,

    1. Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
    2. Also at Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
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  • Steven Pawson,

    1. Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
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  • Hideaki Nakajima

    1. National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan
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Abstract

[1] Ozone data from the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer-II (ILAS-II) were included in addition to other satellite observations in the ozone assimilation system at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) of NASA/Goddard. The control run assimilated data from NOAA 16 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement III (POAM III) instruments. Persistent impacts over Antarctica and transient impacts over northern middle and high latitudes are seen from April to October 2003, when ILAS-II provided good coverage. The largest improvements with respect to independent ozone sonde data are seen over the South Pole station. Ozone analyses and forecasts from the assimilation of SBUV/2, POAM III and ILAS-II data are used to investigate the transport of ozone to southern middle latitudes following the breakup of the Antarctic vortex. The quality of analyses and forecasts is evaluated by comparison with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) ozone data near 46°S. Anomaly correlations between SAGE III data and forecasts are improved at 70 hPa when occultation data are included.

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