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jgrb15437-sup-0001-t01.txtplain text document1KTab-delimited Table 1.
jgrb15437-sup-0002-t02.txtplain text document1KTab-delimited Table 2.
jgrb15437-sup-0003-t03.txtplain text document1KTab-delimited Table 3.
jgrb15437-sup-0004-m01.movQuickTime video8529KMovie 1. A large plume covered the summit during the first ROV dive in 2006 (J2-186). ROV is ∼80 m above Brimstone Pit. Bubbles of CO2 are visible rising past the ROV
jgrb15437-sup-0005-m02.movQuickTime video9089KMovie 2. The first visit to Brimstone Pit showed that most of the cinder cone was gone (dive J2-187; number on overlay is incorrect). The yellow sulfur coated wall behind the vent is a remnant of the preexisting cone. At first, the eruptive vent was only discharging a weak plume. Later the gas flux increased and CO2bubbles streamed from the vent.
jgrb15437-sup-0006-m03.movQuickTime video8752KMovie 3. During the second visit to Brimstone Pit, lava was passively extruding from the vent accompanied by strong degassing of both CO2 bubbles and sulfur-dominated particle plumes (dive J2-187; number on overlay is incorrect). Red lasers are 10 cm apart.
jgrb15437-sup-0007-m04.movQuickTime video8156KMovie 4. Later during the second visit to Brimstone Pit, lava extrusion occurred in pulses preceded by streams of CO2 bubbles (dive J2-187; number on overlay is incorrect
jgrb15437-sup-0008-m05.movQuickTime video8300KMovie 5. A sulfur-dominated particle plume is discharged directly from a lobe of actively extruding lava during the second visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-187; number on overlay is incorrect). Red lasers are 10 cm apart.
jgrb15437-sup-0009-m06.movQuickTime video9498KMovie 6. Mild explosions observed during the fourth visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-189). A tephra cone has now formed over the vent.
jgrb15437-sup-0010-m07.movQuickTime video9614KMovie 7. Later during the fourth visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-189), mild explosions continue at Vent A (upper left) while a more vigorous burst suddenly erupts from Vent B (upper right), generating a dilute density flow. The ROV is positioned ∼10 m downslope from the vents and lifts off the bottom as the cloud approaches.
jgrb15437-sup-0011-m08.movQuickTime video7942KMovie 8. During the fifth visit to Brimstone Pit, CO2 bubbles and sulfur-dominated plumes create a lobate pattern of degassing on the flanks of the Vent C tephra cone (dive J2-189). Red lasers are 10 cm apart.
jgrb15437-sup-0012-m09.movQuickTime video9045KMovie 9. Later during the fifth visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-189), intense degassing accompanies mild explosions at Vent C, including CO2 bubbles and a very yellow sulfur-dominated plume. Fragmental lava can be seen falling from the plume. Red lasers are 10 cm apart.
jgrb15437-sup-0013-m10.movQuickTime video9133KMovie 10. Brief, strong explosions occurred at the vent late in the fifth visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-189).
jgrb15437-sup-0014-m11.movQuickTime video7100KMovie 11. During the sixth visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-191), the active vents were shallower and located up against the sulfur wall. At first, globules of sulfur are visible raining out of the plume. Later, visibility becomes poor when explosion clouds and ashfall engulf the vehicle.
jgrb15437-sup-0015-m12.movQuickTime video13387KMovie 12. Sequence of three clips during the seventh visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-192) showing: (a) the beginning of an explosive burst (2144:08 to 2144:29 UT), (b) a plug of lava being forced upward in the vent and blown apart (2144:44 to 2145:19 UT), and (c) the end of the same burst (2150:28 to 2150:49 UT). Audio is the sound recorded by the hydrophone during the same time intervals.
jgrb15437-sup-0016-m13.movQuickTime video9236KMovie 13. Another view of a lava plug being destroyed at the beginning of an explosive burst during the seventh visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-192; 2054:05 to 2055:08 UT). Flat, disc-shaped bombs ejected from the vent are probably remnants of the lava cap. Audio is the sound recorded by the hydrophone during the same time interval.
jgrb15437-sup-0017-m14.movQuickTime video7358KMovie 14. Flashes of red glow are visible in the vent during this explosive burst. Audio is the sound recorded by the hydrophone during the same time interval. This burst was the largest observed and had the highest recorded acoustic amplitude during the seventh visit to Brimstone Pit (dive J2-192). The rapid oscillations in the eruption plume are interpreted to be due to steam formation and condensation as hot lava and seawater interact.
jgrb15437-sup-0018-m15.movQuickTime video8551KMovie 15. Slow motion segment of Movie 14 showing red flashes and plume oscillations (J2-192; 2058:48-2059:00 UT).

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